Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Second-generation antidepressants and cognitive–behavioural therapy are both viable choices for initial treatment of major depression
  1. Atsuo Nakagawa
  1. Clinical and Translational Research Center, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Atsuo Nakagawa, Clinical and Translational Research Center, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi 35, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; anakagawa{at}keio.jp

Statistics from Altmetric.com

ABSTRACT FROM: Amick HR, Gartlehner G, Gaynes BN, et al. Comparative benefits and harms of second generation antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapies in initial treatment of major depressive disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2015;351:h6019.

What is already known on this topic

There is a pressing need to generate clear hierarchies of the benefits and harms of available treatments to implement optimal clinical practice. Second-generation antidepressants (SGAs) and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) have proven efficacy in the treatment of major depression.1 However, comparative benefits and harms of SGAs and CBT for the initial treatment for major depression remain unclear.

Methods of the study

Amick and colleagues carried out a systematic review and evaluated 11 randomised controlled trials to compare the benefits and harms of SGAs and CBT for the initial treatment of major depressive disorder in 1511 adults. The study included papers …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.