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Significant methodological flaws limit conclusions drawn by authors of a recent PTSD mindfulness study
  1. Daniel J Lee1,2,
  2. Charles W Hoge3
  1. 1US Food and Drug Association, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
  2. 2Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  3. 3Center for Psychiatry & Neuroscience, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Daniel J Lee, US Food and Drug Association, Silver Spring, MD 20850, USA; Daniel.James.Lee{at}gmail.com

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ABSTRACT FROM: OpenUrlCrossRefPubMed

What is already known on this topic

Of six major international post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment guidelines, only two mention mindfulness-based treatments, and none recommend their routine use.1 ,2 Few mindfulness-based intervention studies exist for PTSD, and all have significant limitations in design, outcome measures and/or data handling.1 However, these interventions remain widely used. A core-component of PTSD treatment addresses autonomic hyperarousal, and many clinicians apply mindfulness techniques for this or in facilitating treatment for patients too avoidant for trauma-focused psychotherapies (TFPs).

Methods of the study

This was a 17-week RCT involving 116 US Veteran's Association participants, comparing group mindfulness-based psychotherapy against group present-centred psychotherapy. The primary outcome, change in symptom severity, was assessed using the PTSD checklist (PCL; range, 17–85 with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms). As a secondary efficacy …

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